Why Accidents Are a Minor Cause of Death and Injury for Persons One to 37 Years of Age

Accidents are often perceived as a major threat to life and health, especially for young people. However, according to the latest statistics, accidents are a minor cause of death and injury for persons one to 37 years of age, compared to other factors such as diseases, violence, and suicide. In this article, we will explore the reasons behind this surprising finding and what it means for public health and safety.

The Definition and Scope of Accidents

First of all, we need to clarify what we mean by accidents. Examples of accidents include road traffic crashes, falls, burns, drowning, poisoning, and animal bites.

Accidents are different from intentional injuries, which are caused by deliberate acts of violence or self-harm, such as homicide, assault, suicide, and war. Intentional injuries are also a major cause of death and disability among young people, but they are not the focus of this article.

Accidents are also different from non-communicable diseases (NCDs), which are chronic conditions that are not caused by infectious agents, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and respiratory diseases. NCDs are the leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide, but they are more prevalent among older people.

The Global and National Burden of Accidents

DALYs are a measure of the years of healthy life lost due to premature death or disability. Accidents were the fourth leading cause of death and the fifth leading cause of DALYs lost, after NCDs, infectious diseases, and intentional injuries.

However, the burden of accidents varies significantly by age group, region, and income level. Accidents are more common and fatal among younger people, especially children and adolescents. Accidents are also more prevalent and severe in low- and middle-income countries, where the resources and infrastructure for prevention and treatment are limited.

Accidents were the fifth leading cause of death and the sixth leading cause of DALYs lost, after NCDs, infectious diseases, intentional injuries, and maternal and neonatal conditions.

However, when we look at the age-specific data, we find that accidents are a minor cause of death and injury for persons one to 37 years of age in India. Accidents were the ninth leading cause of death and the tenth leading cause of DALYs lost, after NCDs, infectious diseases, intentional injuries, maternal and neonatal conditions, nutritional deficiencies, congenital anomalies, digestive diseases, and respiratory infections.

The Reasons Behind the Low Burden of Accidents

Why are accidents a minor cause of death and injury for persons one to 37 years of age in India? There are several possible explanations for this phenomenon.

One reason is that the mortality rate from accidents is relatively low in this age group, compared to other causes of death. This suggests that the younger and older age groups have a lower risk of dying from road accidents, which are the most common type of accidents in India.

Another reason is that the morbidity rate from accidents is also relatively low in this age group, compared to other causes of disability. However, these causes of disability are more likely to affect children and older people, who are more vulnerable to physical trauma and environmental hazards. For example, drowning is the leading cause of accidental death among children under five years old in India, while falls are the leading cause of accidental injury among people over 60 years old. Therefore, the persons one to 37 years of age have a lower chance of suffering from severe or lasting impairments from accidents.

A third reason is that the persons one to 37 years of age have a higher chance of surviving and recovering from accidents, thanks to their better health status and access to health care. However, the CFR of accidents varies by age group, region, and income level. The CFR of accidents is higher among older people, who have more comorbidities and weaker immune systems. The CFR of accidents is also higher in rural areas and poorer states, where the availability and quality of emergency and trauma care are lower. Therefore, the persons one to 37 years of age, who are more likely to live in urban areas and richer states, have a higher chance of surviving and recovering from accidents.

The Implications and Recommendations for Public Health and Safety

The fact that accidents are a minor cause of death and injury for persons one to 37 years of age in India does not mean that they are negligible or ignorable. Accidents still pose a significant threat to the health and well-being of this age group, as well as their families and communities. Accidents also have a huge economic and social impact, as they result in loss of productivity, income, and quality of life. Therefore, it is important to take measures to prevent and reduce the burden of accidents among this age group, as well as other age groups.

Some of the possible measures to prevent and reduce the burden of accidents are:

  • Enhancing the emergency and trauma care services, such as by expanding the network of ambulances, hospitals, and trauma centers, and improving the training and equipment of the health workers.
  • Promoting the awareness and education on accident prevention and first aid, such as by conducting campaigns, workshops, and courses on road safety, fire safety, water safety, and other relevant topics.

By taking these measures, we can hope to reduce the burden of accidents among persons one to 37 years of age, as well as other age groups, and improve the public health and safety in India. Accidents are a minor cause of death and injury for persons one to 37 years of age, but they are not inevitable or unavoidable. We can prevent and reduce them by taking collective and individual actions.