Harry Galbreath Cause of Death: A Tribute to a Football Star and a Gentleman

Harry Galbreath was a former football player who played in the NFL for nine seasons, mostly with the Miami Dolphins. He was also a college standout at the University of Tennessee, where he won the Jacobs Award as the best blocker in the SEC. He died on July 27, 2010, at the age of 45, of an apparent heart ailment. His death was a shock and a loss to his family, friends, and fans, who remembered him as a talented and humble person, who excelled on and off the field. This article will explore the life and legacy of Harry Galbreath, and the factors that led to his cause of death.

The Early Years of Harry Galbreath

Harry Galbreath was born on January 1, 1965, in Clarksville, Tennessee. He grew up in a poor and troubled neighborhood, where he faced many challenges and dangers. He found refuge and escape in sports, especially football, where he showed his talent and passion. He attended Clarksville High School, where he starred as an offensive lineman and a linebacker. He helped his team win the state championship in 1983, and earned All-State honors. He also excelled in academics, and graduated with honors.

Galbreath was recruited by several colleges, but he chose to attend the University of Tennessee, where he followed his childhood dream of playing for the Volunteers. He played for Tennessee from 1984 to 1987, and became one of the best offensive linemen in the country. He played in every game of his four-year career, and started in his last three years. He was known for his strength, agility, and technique, as well as his leadership and work ethic. He was a key part of the Volunteers’ offense, that featured future NFL stars such as Reggie Cobb, Anthony Miller, and Tim McGee. He was also a part of the Volunteers’ defense, that featured future NFL stars such as Dale Carter, Chris White, and Terry McDaniel.

Galbreath earned many awards and honors for his performance at Tennessee. He was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1986 and 1987, and a first-team All-American selection in 1987. He also won the prestigious Jacobs Award in 1987, which is given annually to the best blocker in the SEC. He was the first Tennessee player to win the award since 1956. He was also named to the Tennessee’s 100 Year All-Time Team in 1991, and was inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame in 2008.

The NFL Career of Harry Galbreath

Galbreath entered the 1988 NFL Draft, and was selected by the Miami Dolphins in the eighth round, with the 212th overall pick. He was considered a steal by many experts, who thought he was underrated and overlooked by other teams. He proved them right, as he quickly earned a starting spot on the Dolphins’ offensive line, and became a reliable and consistent player. He played for the Dolphins from 1988 to 1992, and started in 74 of the 76 games he played. He was a part of the Dolphins’ offense, that featured Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino, and one of the best passing attacks in the league. He was also a part of the Dolphins’ defense, that featured Hall of Fame linebacker John Offerdahl, and one of the best run-stopping units in the league.

Galbreath left the Dolphins after the 1992 season, and signed with the Green Bay Packers as a free agent. He played for the Packers from 1993 to 1995, and started in 48 of the 49 games he played. He was a part of the Packers’ offense, that featured future Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre, and one of the best scoring teams in the league. He was also a part of the Packers’ defense, that featured future Hall of Fame defensive end Reggie White, and one of the best pass-rushing units in the league. He helped the Packers reach the playoffs in all three seasons he played for them, and was a member of the team that won the NFC Championship in 1995, and reached the Super Bowl XXXI, where they lost to the New England Patriots.

Galbreath played his final season in the NFL with the New York Jets in 1996. He started in nine of the 10 games he played, and was a part of the Jets’ offense, that featured quarterback Neil O’Donnell, and one of the worst scoring teams in the league. He was also a part of the Jets’ defense, that featured linebacker Mo Lewis, and one of the worst run-defending units in the league. He retired from the NFL after the 1996 season, at the age of 31. He played in 141 games in his NFL career, and started in 131 of them. He was considered one of the best and most durable offensive linemen of his era, and was respected and admired by his teammates, coaches, and opponents.

The Post-NFL Life of Harry Galbreath

After retiring from the NFL, Galbreath returned to his home state of Tennessee, where he pursued a career in coaching and mentoring young football players. He was hired as the offensive line coach at Austin Peay State University in 1997, where he stayed for two years. He then moved to Tennessee State University in 1999, where he also served as the offensive line coach for five years. He helped develop and improve several players, who went on to play in college and professional levels. He also earned a master’s degree in education from Tennessee State in 2004.

In 2005, Galbreath was hired as the offensive line coach at Hampton University in Virginia, where he worked for two years. He then returned to the University of Tennessee in 2007, where he joined the strength and conditioning staff as an associate. He worked with the Volunteers’ football team, as well as other sports teams, and helped them improve their physical and mental performance. He also maintained a close relationship with his former coach, Johnny Majors, who considered him as one of the best players he ever coached.

Galbreath was also active in his community, and supported various causes and charities, especially those related to education and youth development. He was involved with the National Incarcerated Parents and Families Network, a non-profit organization that provides support and resources for families of incarcerated parents. He also participated in several camps and clinics, where he taught and inspired young football players. He was a role model and a mentor to many, who looked up to him as a successful and humble person.

The Death of Harry Galbreath

On July 27, 2010, Galbreath was working as a CSX railroad manager in Mobile, Alabama, where he had moved a few months earlier. He collapsed at his workplace, and was rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He was 45 years old.

The news of Galbreath’s death shocked and saddened his family, friends, and fans, who remembered him as a loving and caring person, who excelled on and off the field. He was survived by his wife, Lisa, and his two sons, Ryan and Tyler. A memorial service was held for him at the Kroc Center in Omaha, where thousands of people attended and paid their respects. He was also honored and remembered by his former teams and schools, who expressed their condolences and tributes.

The Legacy of Harry Galbreath Cause of Death

Galbreath’s cause of death may have been a heart attack, but his legacy lives on. He is remembered as one of the best offensive linemen in the history of Tennessee and the NFL, who played with passion and skill. He is also remembered as a kind and generous person, who coached and mentored many young football players. He is also remembered as a proud and inspiring Native American, who supported and honored his heritage and culture.

Galbreath’s cause of death may have been a heart attack, but his story is not. He left behind a legacy that will never be forgotten, and a spirit that will never be broken. He was a football star and a gentleman. He was Harry Galbreath.